How Hormone Imbalances Can Cause Peripheral Neuropathy

Peripheral neuropathy refers to damage to the peripheral nerves that carry information to and from the brain and spinal cord, affecting various functions in your body like movement and sensation. A common but often overlooked cause of peripheral neuropathy is hormone imbalances. In this blog post, we’ll explore how hormonal changes can lead to neuropathic conditions and the symptoms you might experience.

Have you been diagnosed with peripheral neuropathy? We can help.

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What causes peripheral neuropathies?

Peripheral neuropathies can occur due to various conditions, ranging from diabetes to infections. But hormone imbalances are an often underestimated trigger. Let’s delve into the specifics:

Hormone imbalances and peripheral neuropathy

  • Thyroid hormones: Hypothyroidism, a condition where your thyroid gland doesn’t produce enough thyroid hormone, can lead to peripheral neuropathy. Lack of thyroid hormone slows metabolism, causing fluid retention and tissue swelling. This swelling can put pressure on peripheral nerves, most commonly manifesting in the wrists, leading to conditions like carpal tunnel syndrome.
  • Growth hormones: Overproduction of growth hormone can cause acromegaly, a condition leading to abnormal enlargement of skeletal parts, including joints. This can result in nerves becoming entrapped within these enlarged areas.
  • Sex hormones: Research suggests that declining estrogen levels in post-menopausal women can be critical for the development of peripheral neuropathy. This aligns with the known role of estrogen in neural protection and regeneration.

Can hypothyroidism cause peripheral neuropathy?

Yes, untreated, severe hypothyroidism can cause peripheral neuropathy. Symptoms may include pain, burning sensations, loss of sensation and tingling in affected areas. Treatment generally involves managing the underlying hypothyroidism, often with medications like Levothyroxine, as well as lifestyle changes like exercise.

Hormones and paresthesia

Often mistaken for peripheral neuropathy, paresthesia refers to sensations of tingling, burning or numbness on the skin. During menopause, fluctuating estrogen levels can cause paresthesia, primarily affecting the arms, legs, hands, feet, fingers and toes. The symptoms can range from mild tingling to a severe burning sensation.

Treatment Options

Treatment often revolves around addressing the underlying hormonal imbalance and alleviating symptoms. Common approaches include:

  • Medications: Levothyroxine is commonly prescribed for treating hypothyroidism and can improve neuropathy symptoms.
  • Lifestyle changes: Exercise and maintaining a healthy weight can help minimize stress on your body and strengthen affected limbs.

Conclusion

If you suspect that hormonal imbalances might be contributing to your peripheral neuropathy or if you’re experiencing troubling symptoms, consult your healthcare provider for proper diagnosis and treatment options.

Remember, your hormones play an essential role in your overall health, including the well-being of your nervous system. Understanding the link between hormones and peripheral neuropathy can be the first step toward effective treatment.

WinSanTor is a clinical-stage biotechnology company focused on the discovery and development of treatments for peripheral neuropathies. We believe in creating a solution that works and brings relief to millions who are struggling with this disease. Learn more about our companyour drug and subscribe to our newsletter.

Sources

FAQs

What types of hormone imbalances may cause peripheral neuropathy?

Thyroid hormones: Hypothyroidism, a condition where your thyroid gland doesn't produce enough thyroid hormone, can lead to peripheral neuropathy. Lack of thyroid hormone slows metabolism, causing fluid retention and tissue swelling. This swelling can put pressure on peripheral nerves, most commonly manifesting in the wrists, leading to conditions like carpal tunnel syndrome.
Growth hormones: Overproduction of growth hormone can cause acromegaly, a condition leading to abnormal enlargement of skeletal parts, including joints. This can result in nerves becoming entrapped within these enlarged areas.
Sex hormones: Research suggests that declining estrogen levels in post-menopausal women can be critical for the development of peripheral neuropathy. This aligns with the known role of estrogen in neural protection and regeneration.

Can hypothyroidism cause peripheral neuropathy?

Yes, untreated, severe hypothyroidism can cause peripheral neuropathy.

Does menopause cause peripheral neuropathy?

Often mistaken for peripheral neuropathy, paresthesia refers to sensations of tingling, burning or numbness on the skin. During menopause, fluctuating estrogen levels can cause paresthesia, primarily affecting the arms, legs, hands, feet, fingers and toes.

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